Since the coronavirus has upended almost every business in America, many small businesses are taking hard financial hits. Now that both local and state governments have laid down restrictions and closed many establishments, it’s becoming extremely challenging to conduct much person-to-person business.

However, many small businesses have made swift changes to adapt and try to survive through the COVID-19 pandemic. Some companies are doing an excellent job of remaining connected to their clients using several different strategies. Some small business owners are now offering completely new services, like delivering their products to their customers’ homes. Also, we’re seeing many in-person appointments being changed to online video conferences.

 

These are just a couple of examples of how small businesses have altered their strategies to survive this pandemic. So, if you own a small business and you’re wondering what you need to do to survive this crisis, we’ll cover some ways you can evolve your business model so that you can help your business through this trying time.

 

1. Get Ready to Adapt

 

First, business owners and employees must be ready to adapt so that they overcome new challenges. Currently, the way the coronavirus is transmitted isn’t totally understood. However, we do know that person-to-person interaction must be present for the virus to pass to another person. So, having any group of people together creates a higher chance of transmission, which then keeps the virus alive.

 

So, businesses need to plan ahead so that they can adapt to the current restrictions. A study done by Columbia University demonstrates that certain control measures, like self-isolation and social distancing, provide us with various outbreak timelines. Right now, in the U.S., the coronavirus should peak in the middle of June and continue through August. However, there’s still a lot of uncertainty about those timelines, since many businesses have been told they may be able to reopen anytime between mid-May and August.

 

Thus, businesses need to adjust their business plans, research timelines, and hiring strategies temporarily. Also, by adapting and offering new services, like many restaurants that are offering delivery services for the first time ever, you’ll still be able to reach your customers and survive the crisis.

 

2. Amend Your Business Plan Accordingly

 

Many companies have created work-from-home orders, which means more and more people are working at home. If this is your first time operating your small business from home, you may have some free time in your schedule currently. It’s a good idea to use that time to start creating new strategies for your business so that you amend your business plan accordingly.

 

Much like many companies did during the 2008 recession, many companies now are coming up with new resources and ideas so that they can survive this unplanned event. By using your creativity, you can find new opportunities and ways to reach your customers.

 

3. Focus on Your Business Surviving

 

To ensure that your business survives, you’ll need to make sure you’re connecting properly with your employees. By spending some time talking to your employees, you’ll be able to convey a feeling of unity even when the economic burden is significant. You can even seek employee viewpoints and have them offer solutions and ideas to help the business survive. By using this wide pool of people for information, you may find a fresh new concept that will help you survive.

 

You can also use several outside resources if you want to maintain communication with your employees. If you need any help, consider contacting the Small Business Administration. This administration features many local offices that are there to specifically help small businesses connect with their employees. You can receive resources like online training, loan help, and OSHA assistance to keep your small business going.

 

4. Seek Opportunity

 

Several companies are coming out with websites that support local businesses. These companies are doing things like bringing traffic to struggling restaurants to help them survive the crisis through online sales. While this may not work in the short-term, it does help create a long-term relationship with many companies once they start booming again.

 

Some companies are using out-of-the box methods to stay afloat. For instance, a few distilleries are trying to make up for shortages in things like hand sanitizer, changing the way they manufacture to provide needed items to their communities.

 

5. Adapt, Adapt, Adapt….

 

When dealing with city and state restrictions, we’ve seen some creative business adaptations happening nationwide. For instance, New York City has some of the hardest restrictions right now. To try and adapt to this crisis, James Corbett Studio, located in Manhattan, expanded their offerings. They won’t allow more than five people at once into their salon. So, they now offer in-house calls and are also considering pop-up salons in the Hamptons to reach those customers.

 

Seattle is another example of a community that’s been hard-hit by the coronavirus, and thus they have major restrictions in place in this city. To adapt to these challenges, Piroshky Piroshky, a bakery in Seattle, are live-streaming from their business so that they can include customers in their baking processes. On top of this, the bakery also partnered with Pike Place Chowder so that it can home-deliver its offerings, something the bakery never offered previously.

 

6. Fear Is the Killer of Small Business……………

 

Above all else, don’t let yourself get caught up in the fear and hype of the coronavirus to the point where you feel like your business can’t survive. If you give up now, then there is really no hope for your small business. However, if you are able to grasp some fresh, new strategies and adapt, you’ll likely survive this outbreak, and you might even learn a thing or two after you’ve created some new services.

Since the coronavirus has upended almost every business in America, many small businesses are taking hard financial hits. Now that both local and state governments have laid down restrictions and closed many establishments, it’s becoming extremely challenging to conduct much person-to-person business.

However, many small businesses have made swift changes to adapt and try to survive through the COVID-19 pandemic. Some companies are doing an excellent job of remaining connected to their clients using several different strategies. Some small business owners are now offering completely new services, like delivering their products to their customers’ homes. Also, we’re seeing many in-person appointments being changed to online video conferences.

 

These are just a couple of examples of how small businesses have altered their strategies to survive this pandemic. So, if you own a small business and you’re wondering what you need to do to survive this crisis, we’ll cover some ways you can evolve your business model so that you can help your business through this trying time.

 

1. Get Ready to Adapt

 

First, business owners and employees must be ready to adapt so that they overcome new challenges. Currently, the way the coronavirus is transmitted isn’t totally understood. However, we do know that person-to-person interaction must be present for the virus to pass to another person. So, having any group of people together creates a higher chance of transmission, which then keeps the virus alive.

 

So, businesses need to plan ahead so that they can adapt to the current restrictions. A study done by Columbia University demonstrates that certain control measures, like self-isolation and social distancing, provide us with various outbreak timelines. Right now, in the U.S., the coronavirus should peak in the middle of June and continue through August. However, there’s still a lot of uncertainty about those timelines, since many businesses have been told they may be able to reopen anytime between mid-May and August.

 

Thus, businesses need to adjust their business plans, research timelines, and hiring strategies temporarily. Also, by adapting and offering new services, like many restaurants that are offering delivery services for the first time ever, you’ll still be able to reach your customers and survive the crisis.

 

2. Amend Your Business Plan Accordingly

 

Many companies have created work-from-home orders, which means more and more people are working at home. If this is your first time operating your small business from home, you may have some free time in your schedule currently. It’s a good idea to use that time to start creating new strategies for your business so that you amend your business plan accordingly.

 

Much like many companies did during the 2008 recession, many companies now are coming up with new resources and ideas so that they can survive this unplanned event. By using your creativity, you can find new opportunities and ways to reach your customers.

 

3. Focus on Your Business Surviving

 

To ensure that your business survives, you’ll need to make sure you’re connecting properly with your employees. By spending some time talking to your employees, you’ll be able to convey a feeling of unity even when the economic burden is significant. You can even seek employee viewpoints and have them offer solutions and ideas to help the business survive. By using this wide pool of people for information, you may find a fresh new concept that will help you survive.

 

You can also use several outside resources if you want to maintain communication with your employees. If you need any help, consider contacting the Small Business Administration. This administration features many local offices that are there to specifically help small businesses connect with their employees. You can receive resources like online training, loan help, and OSHA assistance to keep your small business going.

 

4. Seek Opportunity

 

Several companies are coming out with websites that support local businesses. These companies are doing things like bringing traffic to struggling restaurants to help them survive the crisis through online sales. While this may not work in the short-term, it does help create a long-term relationship with many companies once they start booming again.

 

Some companies are using out-of-the box methods to stay afloat. For instance, a few distilleries are trying to make up for shortages in things like hand sanitizer, changing the way they manufacture to provide needed items to their communities.

 

5. Adapt, Adapt, Adapt….

 

When dealing with city and state restrictions, we’ve seen some creative business adaptations happening nationwide. For instance, New York City has some of the hardest restrictions right now. To try and adapt to this crisis, James Corbett Studio, located in Manhattan, expanded their offerings. They won’t allow more than five people at once into their salon. So, they now offer in-house calls and are also considering pop-up salons in the Hamptons to reach those customers.

 

Seattle is another example of a community that’s been hard-hit by the coronavirus, and thus they have major restrictions in place in this city. To adapt to these challenges, Piroshky Piroshky, a bakery in Seattle, are live-streaming from their business so that they can include customers in their baking processes. On top of this, the bakery also partnered with Pike Place Chowder so that it can home-deliver its offerings, something the bakery never offered previously.

 

6. Fear Is the Killer of Small Business……………

 

Above all else, don’t let yourself get caught up in the fear and hype of the coronavirus to the point where you feel like your business can’t survive. If you give up now, then there is really no hope for your small business. However, if you are able to grasp some fresh, new strategies and adapt, you’ll likely survive this outbreak, and you might even learn a thing or two after you’ve created some new services.